Defining “Human”: The Blurry Line between Human, Androids, and Animals in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Main Article Content

Sevda Altınoluk

Abstract

Twentieth-century witnessed grand global wars including World War I, World War II and the Cold War. All these wars echoed in literature and showed the reader different representations or some predictions related to them. Especially, dystopian fiction began to flourish after such wars. As one of these wars, the Cold War led Philip K. Dick to write his work titled Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Seed, 1999). As Seed states in his book, the Cold War was a metaphor and the War itself also was structured around metaphors that are actualized in post-war science fictions in different narrations.  In that sense, we see the echoes of the Cold War in Dick's novel as well, which sets in the post-apocalyptic world after a nuclear global war named World War Terminus. This war gives the reader an alternative end to the nuclear war which resulted in the devastation of earth and emigration to Mars. Through this post-war depiction, Dick explores the question “What is human?” by using posthuman entities like androids and artificial animals. We can assert that Dick tries to show the reader the blurry connection between human beings and androids by using empathy, authentic and artificial animals and the theology called Mercerism in his novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

How to Cite
Altınoluk, S. (2020). Defining “Human”: The Blurry Line between Human, Androids, and Animals in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. Journal of English Language and Literature Club, 2(1), 17-21. Retrieved from https://dergi.ingilizedebiyati.net/cuidek/article/view/154
Section
Articles

References

Dick, Philip K. (1996). Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? New York: Ballantine.
Galvan, Jills (1997). “Entering the Posthuman Collective in Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” Science Fiction Studies, Vol. 24, No. 3, 413-429.
Hayley, N. Katherine (1998). “Schizoid Android: Cybernetics and the Mid-Sixties Novels of Philip K. Dick.” Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts, 8, 22-45.
Seed, David (1999). American Science Fiction and the Cold War: Literature and Film. United Kingdom: Edinburgh University Press.
Vinci, Tony M (2014). “Posthuman Wounds: Trauma, Non-Anthropocentric Vulnerability, and the Human/Android/Animal Dynamic in Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” The Journal of the Midwest Modern Language Association, Vol. 47, No. 2, 91-112.